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Cancer experts encourage screenings

Jul 22, 2021, 10:00 AM
Talk with your health care providers to resume regular primary care checkups and recommended cancer screenings.

The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) notified member organizations, such as Skagit Regional Health, that they have joined the American Cancer Society (ACS) in a nationwide effort to encourage patients to resume appropriate cancer screenings to prevent a more extensive illness or excess deaths.

Staff holds cancer screening sign

The CoC is urging people to talk with their health care providers to resume regular primary care checkups and recommended cancer screenings. This discussion has the potential to lessen the negative impact that the pandemic is having on identifying and treating people with cancer.

Throughout the pandemic, many health care resources were redirected to combat rising COVID-19 cases and to prevent the spread of the virus. Elective medical procedures, including cancer screening, were largely put on hold at the onset of the pandemic in 2020 and have since resumed.

The impact was immediate as screening-related procedures dropped drastically in March and May 2020, according to the ACS. Estimates also project 35 percent of Americans missed routine cancer screening due to COVID-19-related fears and service disruptions and 41 percent have delayed or avoided some medical care because of the pandemic.

The ACS foresees that the pandemic-related reductions in health care access and cancer screening will result in a short-term drop in cancer diagnoses and a later corresponding increase in late-state diagnoses and preventable deaths.

The ACS notes three several important messages:

  1. Screenings can help catch cancer early.
  2. Regular screening tests can improve and save your life.
  3. One in three Americans will get cancer in their lifetime, but finding cancer early means it may be easier to treat.
  4. Talk to your doctor about safely resuming care, screenings and next steps.

Skagit Regional Health offers a variety of tests to screen for colorectal, breast, lung, cervical, prostate and other cancers.

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Last post : 07/25/2021

Cancer experts encourage screenings

Jul 22, 2021, 10:00 AM
Talk with your health care providers to resume regular primary care checkups and recommended cancer screenings.

The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) notified member organizations, such as Skagit Regional Health, that they have joined the American Cancer Society (ACS) in a nationwide effort to encourage patients to resume appropriate cancer screenings to prevent a more extensive illness or excess deaths.

Staff holds cancer screening sign

The CoC is urging people to talk with their health care providers to resume regular primary care checkups and recommended cancer screenings. This discussion has the potential to lessen the negative impact that the pandemic is having on identifying and treating people with cancer.

Throughout the pandemic, many health care resources were redirected to combat rising COVID-19 cases and to prevent the spread of the virus. Elective medical procedures, including cancer screening, were largely put on hold at the onset of the pandemic in 2020 and have since resumed.

The impact was immediate as screening-related procedures dropped drastically in March and May 2020, according to the ACS. Estimates also project 35 percent of Americans missed routine cancer screening due to COVID-19-related fears and service disruptions and 41 percent have delayed or avoided some medical care because of the pandemic.

The ACS foresees that the pandemic-related reductions in health care access and cancer screening will result in a short-term drop in cancer diagnoses and a later corresponding increase in late-state diagnoses and preventable deaths.

The ACS notes three several important messages:

  1. Screenings can help catch cancer early.
  2. Regular screening tests can improve and save your life.
  3. One in three Americans will get cancer in their lifetime, but finding cancer early means it may be easier to treat.
  4. Talk to your doctor about safely resuming care, screenings and next steps.

Skagit Regional Health offers a variety of tests to screen for colorectal, breast, lung, cervical, prostate and other cancers.