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Cascade Valley Hospital Director of Pharmacy and Pharmacist honored by UW School of Pharmacy

Jun 7, 2021, 18:11 PM
Director of Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacist at CVH

Robert Cockrell, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy and Val Wilkins, RPh, MS, MBA, MHIHIM, Clinical Pharmacist at Cascade Valley Hospital have been working with first-year Pharmacy students from the University of Washington (UW) PharmD program. They were recently recognized with an award for how they have worked to mentor and train future pharmacists.

Their efforts are part of the ‘Wednesdays in Practice’ (WIP) experience as part of the PharmD curriculum at the UW School of Pharmacy. Wilkins and Cockrell have been serving as preceptors for first-year pharmacy students, giving them an opportunity to gain a real-world understanding and application of what they are studying in the classroom.

“The UW PharmD program is a four-year graduate program that trains world-class pharmacists who are ready to practice at the forefront of patient-centered medical care,” said Jennifer Chang, PharmD, BCPS,  Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Preceptor Development at the UW School of Pharmacy. “Our school implemented a new PharmD curriculum in fall of 2019 to better prepare our graduates for practice. This new curriculum integrates world-class classroom instruction with early experiential learning to teach our students practical application of pharmacy concepts and knowledge.”

The early experiential learning Chang is speaking of involves the Wednesdays in Practice (WIP) program. WIP is offered as an introductory practice experience and helps to foster provider readiness by giving students the chance to develop experience, insight, skills and thinking in a real pharmacy environment. Cockrell and Wilkins have been a part of this new curriculum as preceptors since its beginning.

According to the UW School of Pharmacy course guide, each student involved in WIP will:

  • Participate in a longitudinal experience that fosters the student’s understanding of patients’ experiences with health and wellness.
  • Establish and maintain relationships through participation in meaningful roles in care, including inter-professional interactions.
  • Provide patient-centered care based on the covenantal relationship with the patient driven by compassion, empathy and duty.
  • Integrate basic, clinical and social sciences to develop skills needed for practice.
  • Intentionally develop as a professional with longitudinal mentoring and curricular/ assessment strategies that progress over time.

WIP preceptors host first-year PharmD students at their own pharmacy sites for this unique longitudinal practice experience. Originally, the UW PharmD curriculum had introductory pharmacy practice experiences scheduled during the summers, however the curriculum was recently re-designed to allow students to come on Wednesdays through the winter and spring quarters starting the first year of their training – allowing early exposure and longitudinal experiences leading to deeper learning.

“Our preceptors help students put learned facts into the context of real practice situations, introduce the students to the many facets of pharmacy practice, act as role models for the kind of practitioner students want to become, and facilitate an experience where students take the responsibility for their learning,” said Chang. “Collectively, preceptors take the educational lead for over 30% of our curriculum.”

This idea of working with students is not new to the two pharmacists.

“I’d been faculty for the school at a previous hospital and frankly missed it,” said Wilkins. “We had a couple of years under our belts with the more ‘traditional’ rotations before the School of Pharmacy approached us to be part of the WIP program.”

Wilkins said that not all pharmacists like to teach, but she knows she enjoys it and is thrilled for this opportunity.

 “Val, who is our primary preceptor, spends a great deal of time and effort engaging with our students,” said Cockrell. “For example, when we were delivering vaccines to our Smokey Point clinic and interacting with the staff there, we took the students with us.”

Cockrell and Wilkins love being a part of WIP – and it turns out they are extremely good at it.

At a regularly scheduled Zoom call to check-in with the UW School of Pharmacy WIP Team, Wilkins and Cockrell were surprised with the honor of Wednesdays in Practice Preceptors of the Year. They also received Certificates of Merit in Precepting. This is the first year that UW has given this award and the second year they have received the certificates of merit.

Both of us were incredibly surprised and honored,” said Wilkins. “This award comes from our students – they nominate us and tell the school why they think we deserve it. The submission takes a fair amount of time and effort on their part.”

“We expect honors like this to go to the large, teaching hospitals like you find in Seattle,” said Cockrell. “For little ole CVH Pharmacy to be selected is truly humbling for us.”

The two of them have proven that medical excellence is not bound by any border, and their efforts help ensure the next generation of medical care will continue with quality and compassion.

“Val and Robert were early adopters of the new Wednesdays in Practice program; they were excited to partner with our school to offer this innovative early experiential education at Cascade Valley Hospital,” said Chang. “They embody the spirit of innovation and transformation of WIP and have provided an incredible learning environment for introductory learners.”

“It’s really satisfying to get such great feedback,” said Wilkins. “Both Robert and I are committed to passing on our love of Hospital Pharmacy to the next generation.”

Excerpts from student nominations for this award:

My preceptors are motivational and positive leaders. Their positive energy is what made me want to get out of bed for the past two weeks and be excited from the moment I walked in the door until the moment we leave.”

“They have left the effect on my partner and I to want to proactively learn and be a part of their pharmacy environment. At CVH Val and Robert have created a space of positivity and comfort for us to speak and learn freely.”

“Witnessing their professionalism and empathy with the patient guided the direction of some of my future interactions with patients. Some of the off-script situations that came up were memorable and aided more in my professional development rather than clinical in most cases.”

“I felt very lucky to be under their guidance and learn so much insight from what they do on a daily basis. They posed questions that made me reflect, research, and really think as to how I would approach a patient’s profile and what I should look up next. Most visits we'd come in, they'd have leaflets or pamphlets printed out as extra resources to look over or learn about that we could take home with us. I felt they truly went over and beyond the tasks asked by the school because they genuinely cared to give us insight on the importance of their job. I felt my WIP experience was a great one just because of them being present! It was a shame our WIP visits were cut short because I know they'd have so much more to teach and offer us.”

To learn more about the UW PharmD curriculum, click here.

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Last post : 06/07/2021

Cascade Valley Hospital Director of Pharmacy and Pharmacist honored by UW School of Pharmacy

Jun 7, 2021, 18:11 PM
Director of Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacist at CVH

Robert Cockrell, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy and Val Wilkins, RPh, MS, MBA, MHIHIM, Clinical Pharmacist at Cascade Valley Hospital have been working with first-year Pharmacy students from the University of Washington (UW) PharmD program. They were recently recognized with an award for how they have worked to mentor and train future pharmacists.

Their efforts are part of the ‘Wednesdays in Practice’ (WIP) experience as part of the PharmD curriculum at the UW School of Pharmacy. Wilkins and Cockrell have been serving as preceptors for first-year pharmacy students, giving them an opportunity to gain a real-world understanding and application of what they are studying in the classroom.

“The UW PharmD program is a four-year graduate program that trains world-class pharmacists who are ready to practice at the forefront of patient-centered medical care,” said Jennifer Chang, PharmD, BCPS,  Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Preceptor Development at the UW School of Pharmacy. “Our school implemented a new PharmD curriculum in fall of 2019 to better prepare our graduates for practice. This new curriculum integrates world-class classroom instruction with early experiential learning to teach our students practical application of pharmacy concepts and knowledge.”

The early experiential learning Chang is speaking of involves the Wednesdays in Practice (WIP) program. WIP is offered as an introductory practice experience and helps to foster provider readiness by giving students the chance to develop experience, insight, skills and thinking in a real pharmacy environment. Cockrell and Wilkins have been a part of this new curriculum as preceptors since its beginning.

According to the UW School of Pharmacy course guide, each student involved in WIP will:

  • Participate in a longitudinal experience that fosters the student’s understanding of patients’ experiences with health and wellness.
  • Establish and maintain relationships through participation in meaningful roles in care, including inter-professional interactions.
  • Provide patient-centered care based on the covenantal relationship with the patient driven by compassion, empathy and duty.
  • Integrate basic, clinical and social sciences to develop skills needed for practice.
  • Intentionally develop as a professional with longitudinal mentoring and curricular/ assessment strategies that progress over time.

WIP preceptors host first-year PharmD students at their own pharmacy sites for this unique longitudinal practice experience. Originally, the UW PharmD curriculum had introductory pharmacy practice experiences scheduled during the summers, however the curriculum was recently re-designed to allow students to come on Wednesdays through the winter and spring quarters starting the first year of their training – allowing early exposure and longitudinal experiences leading to deeper learning.

“Our preceptors help students put learned facts into the context of real practice situations, introduce the students to the many facets of pharmacy practice, act as role models for the kind of practitioner students want to become, and facilitate an experience where students take the responsibility for their learning,” said Chang. “Collectively, preceptors take the educational lead for over 30% of our curriculum.”

This idea of working with students is not new to the two pharmacists.

“I’d been faculty for the school at a previous hospital and frankly missed it,” said Wilkins. “We had a couple of years under our belts with the more ‘traditional’ rotations before the School of Pharmacy approached us to be part of the WIP program.”

Wilkins said that not all pharmacists like to teach, but she knows she enjoys it and is thrilled for this opportunity.

 “Val, who is our primary preceptor, spends a great deal of time and effort engaging with our students,” said Cockrell. “For example, when we were delivering vaccines to our Smokey Point clinic and interacting with the staff there, we took the students with us.”

Cockrell and Wilkins love being a part of WIP – and it turns out they are extremely good at it.

At a regularly scheduled Zoom call to check-in with the UW School of Pharmacy WIP Team, Wilkins and Cockrell were surprised with the honor of Wednesdays in Practice Preceptors of the Year. They also received Certificates of Merit in Precepting. This is the first year that UW has given this award and the second year they have received the certificates of merit.

Both of us were incredibly surprised and honored,” said Wilkins. “This award comes from our students – they nominate us and tell the school why they think we deserve it. The submission takes a fair amount of time and effort on their part.”

“We expect honors like this to go to the large, teaching hospitals like you find in Seattle,” said Cockrell. “For little ole CVH Pharmacy to be selected is truly humbling for us.”

The two of them have proven that medical excellence is not bound by any border, and their efforts help ensure the next generation of medical care will continue with quality and compassion.

“Val and Robert were early adopters of the new Wednesdays in Practice program; they were excited to partner with our school to offer this innovative early experiential education at Cascade Valley Hospital,” said Chang. “They embody the spirit of innovation and transformation of WIP and have provided an incredible learning environment for introductory learners.”

“It’s really satisfying to get such great feedback,” said Wilkins. “Both Robert and I are committed to passing on our love of Hospital Pharmacy to the next generation.”

Excerpts from student nominations for this award:

My preceptors are motivational and positive leaders. Their positive energy is what made me want to get out of bed for the past two weeks and be excited from the moment I walked in the door until the moment we leave.”

“They have left the effect on my partner and I to want to proactively learn and be a part of their pharmacy environment. At CVH Val and Robert have created a space of positivity and comfort for us to speak and learn freely.”

“Witnessing their professionalism and empathy with the patient guided the direction of some of my future interactions with patients. Some of the off-script situations that came up were memorable and aided more in my professional development rather than clinical in most cases.”

“I felt very lucky to be under their guidance and learn so much insight from what they do on a daily basis. They posed questions that made me reflect, research, and really think as to how I would approach a patient’s profile and what I should look up next. Most visits we'd come in, they'd have leaflets or pamphlets printed out as extra resources to look over or learn about that we could take home with us. I felt they truly went over and beyond the tasks asked by the school because they genuinely cared to give us insight on the importance of their job. I felt my WIP experience was a great one just because of them being present! It was a shame our WIP visits were cut short because I know they'd have so much more to teach and offer us.”

To learn more about the UW PharmD curriculum, click here.