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Center for Sleep Disorders fully reopens, welcomes new medical director with exciting future ahead

May 3, 2021, 10:00 AM
The Center for Sleep Disorders is fully open and accepting patients for clinic visits and sleep studies.

For the Skagit Regional Health Center for Sleep Disorders, COVID-19 presented a rough road. 

On March 12, 2020, the Center for Sleep Disorders completely closed down and they were unable to see patients or perform sleep studies. By the end of April, they began performing telehealth clinic visits, and by the end of May they were back for face-to-face visits in the clinic, however the lab remained closed. By mid-June, the Center for Sleep Disorders was finally able to open back up in a limited capacity. It seemed things were returning more to normal.

Then came November. The number of COVID-19 cases began a steep incline and as SRH activated their surge plan, Sleep Medicine had to close their doors once again and give up their space to be used as overflow patient space.

“Both times the sleep center was closed down, patients were greatly affected,” explained Marie Burger, Practice Manager for the Center for Sleep Disorders. “Patient appointments and sleep studies were canceled for months. The second closure affected the lab more because we were totally set up for telehealth and only had to cancel a few clinic appointments.” Telehealth offered some hope and flexibility in spite of the unfortunate repeated closure.

Sleep Medicine Provider, Dr. Nikhil SamtaniOn March 15, 2021 the light at the end of the tunnel arrived for the team at the Center for Sleep Disorders. They were able to reopen and come home to their space – they could perform at full capacity. Now, they’re thriving with much excitement for the future.

“We reopened the sleep center with a new Medical Director, six new specialized sleeping recliners and four new adjustable beds,” said Burger. “It was indeed very exciting to reopen after that second closure. We have much to look forward to in the way of improving the patient experience and care.”

The new Medical Director for the Center for Sleep Disorders is Nikhil Samtani, MD. He said he is glad to join the Skagit Regional Health team and further develop the Sleep Medicine program.

“The Pacific Northwest is something that my wife and I have always enjoyed in our travels,” said Dr. Samtani. “Given my clinical and administrative background and interests, I very much related to the project of growing the Sleep Medicine department here at SRH in order to provide a comprehensive sleep program to our community.”

Dr. Samtani received his MD from the University of Seychelles American Institute of Medicine and completed his residency of Internal Medicine at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, MD. He also completed a Sleep Medicine Fellowship at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“Dr. Samtani has brought an energy and enthusiasm to the sleep center. He absolutely loves the field of Sleep Medicine which you can see in the way he interacts with both patients and staff,” said Burger. “Dr. Samtani has a wonderful rapport with our patients, making sure to explain things in a way they can understand and welcoming any questions they may have.”

In addition to his excellent relational skills, Dr. Samtani brings an interest in looking at the whole-health picture when it comes to sleep.

“Sleep Medicine is still relatively new,” explained Dr. Samtani. “We are learning so much every year on how poor sleep can affect cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic and immunologic health. My personal interest is the interaction between sleep-disordered breathing and its effect on cardiac function. I truly find that fascinating and due to this I do not think of sleep disorders as simply fixing one’s snoring or short-term problems, but more of an overall quality of life measure that has both short and long-term benefits.”

The team at the Center for Sleep Disorders likes to think of themselves as a comprehensive sleep disorder center. They explained that patients are seen for not only the obvious sleep issues related to the sleep apnea spectrum, but they also treat patients for insomnia, restless leg syndrome, circadian dysregulation, parasomnias, and more. With the pandemic resulting in significant changes in sleep patterns for many, the Center for Sleep Disorders has an increased focus on sleep and overall health.

The Center for Sleep Disorders is fully open and accepting patients for clinic visits and sleep studies. Call 360-428- 2550.

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Last post : 07/25/2021

Center for Sleep Disorders fully reopens, welcomes new medical director with exciting future ahead

May 3, 2021, 10:00 AM
The Center for Sleep Disorders is fully open and accepting patients for clinic visits and sleep studies.

For the Skagit Regional Health Center for Sleep Disorders, COVID-19 presented a rough road. 

On March 12, 2020, the Center for Sleep Disorders completely closed down and they were unable to see patients or perform sleep studies. By the end of April, they began performing telehealth clinic visits, and by the end of May they were back for face-to-face visits in the clinic, however the lab remained closed. By mid-June, the Center for Sleep Disorders was finally able to open back up in a limited capacity. It seemed things were returning more to normal.

Then came November. The number of COVID-19 cases began a steep incline and as SRH activated their surge plan, Sleep Medicine had to close their doors once again and give up their space to be used as overflow patient space.

“Both times the sleep center was closed down, patients were greatly affected,” explained Marie Burger, Practice Manager for the Center for Sleep Disorders. “Patient appointments and sleep studies were canceled for months. The second closure affected the lab more because we were totally set up for telehealth and only had to cancel a few clinic appointments.” Telehealth offered some hope and flexibility in spite of the unfortunate repeated closure.

Sleep Medicine Provider, Dr. Nikhil SamtaniOn March 15, 2021 the light at the end of the tunnel arrived for the team at the Center for Sleep Disorders. They were able to reopen and come home to their space – they could perform at full capacity. Now, they’re thriving with much excitement for the future.

“We reopened the sleep center with a new Medical Director, six new specialized sleeping recliners and four new adjustable beds,” said Burger. “It was indeed very exciting to reopen after that second closure. We have much to look forward to in the way of improving the patient experience and care.”

The new Medical Director for the Center for Sleep Disorders is Nikhil Samtani, MD. He said he is glad to join the Skagit Regional Health team and further develop the Sleep Medicine program.

“The Pacific Northwest is something that my wife and I have always enjoyed in our travels,” said Dr. Samtani. “Given my clinical and administrative background and interests, I very much related to the project of growing the Sleep Medicine department here at SRH in order to provide a comprehensive sleep program to our community.”

Dr. Samtani received his MD from the University of Seychelles American Institute of Medicine and completed his residency of Internal Medicine at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, MD. He also completed a Sleep Medicine Fellowship at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“Dr. Samtani has brought an energy and enthusiasm to the sleep center. He absolutely loves the field of Sleep Medicine which you can see in the way he interacts with both patients and staff,” said Burger. “Dr. Samtani has a wonderful rapport with our patients, making sure to explain things in a way they can understand and welcoming any questions they may have.”

In addition to his excellent relational skills, Dr. Samtani brings an interest in looking at the whole-health picture when it comes to sleep.

“Sleep Medicine is still relatively new,” explained Dr. Samtani. “We are learning so much every year on how poor sleep can affect cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic and immunologic health. My personal interest is the interaction between sleep-disordered breathing and its effect on cardiac function. I truly find that fascinating and due to this I do not think of sleep disorders as simply fixing one’s snoring or short-term problems, but more of an overall quality of life measure that has both short and long-term benefits.”

The team at the Center for Sleep Disorders likes to think of themselves as a comprehensive sleep disorder center. They explained that patients are seen for not only the obvious sleep issues related to the sleep apnea spectrum, but they also treat patients for insomnia, restless leg syndrome, circadian dysregulation, parasomnias, and more. With the pandemic resulting in significant changes in sleep patterns for many, the Center for Sleep Disorders has an increased focus on sleep and overall health.

The Center for Sleep Disorders is fully open and accepting patients for clinic visits and sleep studies. Call 360-428- 2550.