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Keep up your health care

Oct 29, 2020, 17:33 PM
Whether you have an emergent need or a chronic condition that requires routine care from a provider, patients can feel confident in receiving care at Skagit Regional Health during this COVID-19 pandemic.
Patient receives care in Emergency Department

Getting healthcare is important – now, more than ever. Whether you have an emergent need or a chronic condition that requires routine care from a provider, patients can feel confident in receiving care at Skagit Regional Health during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Staff and providers at the hospitals and clinics are keeping facilities clean and safe following the highest standards. Patients, visitors and staff are all required to wear masks. The number of visitors are limited and a portion of the Emergency Department is sectioned off to help isolate potential COVID-19 patients from non-COVID-19 patients. Staff and providers have access to the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and are following the latest guidance from Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control.

Still, physicians are aware that some patients are concerned about coming in to receive care.

Emergency Department Medical Director Krishnaraj “Raj” Jayarama, DO recalls quite a few patients in recent months who delayed care and arrived at the Skagit Valley Hospital ER with much more serious symptoms.

“When these patients finally do come in, they are sicker than they would have been had they taken action with the onset of symptoms,” he said. “Please don’t let COVID scare you from the hospital and the ER. It’s a safe place to come for care.”

Examples include a person who had chest pain for several days and had suffered a heart attack that now creates lifelong health issues; a patient presented so sick with an infection they needed to be treated in the ICU after waiting to come to the hospital; and a person who had “belly pain” for a period of days who arrived with a ruptured appendix.

“We are seeing a lot of very sick patients and the acuity has gone way up,” Dr. Jayarama said. “We are taking all the right precautions. We are wearing the appropriate PPE. We ask all patients and visitors to wear masks. We can care for you safely.”

Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Davis with provider and nurseSkagit Regional Health staff and providers have treated dozens of inpatients with COVID-19 and are well equipped to care for each patient safely. Patients who test positive are cared for by staff with expertise in respiratory illness in rooms within specific areas of the hospitals with all appropriate precautions in place.

“We are continually monitoring the medical science and our community infection status. We are in close contact with Public Health. Skagit Regional Health is staying ahead of the curve on our safety supplies and processes,” said Connie L. Davis, MD, MHA, Regional Vice President and Chief Medical Officer. “Other than the protection of your own home, we are one of the safest places to be in our community. We are here for you. Come see us with your health concerns. Keep yourself on track for the best health.”

Family Medicine provider David Escobar, DO, who sees patients at Skagit Regional Health – Stanwood and Skagit Regional Clinics - Smokey Point notes that it is especially important for patients to receive care during times of stress.

“One’s health care needs shift frequently, especially during times of stress. We are all feeling the global stress of the current pandemic, and it is important to stay in touch with your primary care provider, especially during these uncertain times,” Dr. Escobar said. “We are offering video visits on a regular basis now and it is rewarding to continue my care of my patients both here in the clinic; and when I am invited to ‘join them’ in their kitchens and living rooms. Please don’t forgo your health care; your health care needs don’t stop because the world is shifting around us – and as always we are here to help.”

Routine care and vaccinations is especially important for children, said Pediatrician Rosana Go, MD of Arlington Pediatrics.

“Keeping your children’s vaccinations up to date is very important now more than ever especially during this time of uncertainty. Vaccines will help children fight off viral and bacterial infections and continue to keep them healthy!” Dr. Go said. “The health and wellbeing of your children will always be our top priority. We are always here to help and answer any questions you have.”

Dr. Barger during surgery

General Surgeon Jimmy Barger, DO, FACOS, who joined Skagit Regional Health in April 2020 as the virus was increasing in prevalence, has been impressed from the beginning with the organization’s safety standards and adherence to local, state and national guidelines.

“Skagit has taken excellent precautions every step of the way,” Dr. Barger said, noting ample PPE is available and staff, patients and visitors wear masks.

With the presence of the virus in the community, Dr. Barger emphasized that people should take the right precautions and seek care as needed.

“The risk of contracting the virus is not any higher in our clinics and hospitals than it is going to the grocery store,” he said. “It is safe. We have screening and masking measures in place and it’s very important to see your physician for concerns and maintenance of routine and chronic issues.”

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Last post : 11/24/2020

Keep up your health care

Oct 29, 2020, 17:33 PM
Whether you have an emergent need or a chronic condition that requires routine care from a provider, patients can feel confident in receiving care at Skagit Regional Health during this COVID-19 pandemic.
Patient receives care in Emergency Department

Getting healthcare is important – now, more than ever. Whether you have an emergent need or a chronic condition that requires routine care from a provider, patients can feel confident in receiving care at Skagit Regional Health during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Staff and providers at the hospitals and clinics are keeping facilities clean and safe following the highest standards. Patients, visitors and staff are all required to wear masks. The number of visitors are limited and a portion of the Emergency Department is sectioned off to help isolate potential COVID-19 patients from non-COVID-19 patients. Staff and providers have access to the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and are following the latest guidance from Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control.

Still, physicians are aware that some patients are concerned about coming in to receive care.

Emergency Department Medical Director Krishnaraj “Raj” Jayarama, DO recalls quite a few patients in recent months who delayed care and arrived at the Skagit Valley Hospital ER with much more serious symptoms.

“When these patients finally do come in, they are sicker than they would have been had they taken action with the onset of symptoms,” he said. “Please don’t let COVID scare you from the hospital and the ER. It’s a safe place to come for care.”

Examples include a person who had chest pain for several days and had suffered a heart attack that now creates lifelong health issues; a patient presented so sick with an infection they needed to be treated in the ICU after waiting to come to the hospital; and a person who had “belly pain” for a period of days who arrived with a ruptured appendix.

“We are seeing a lot of very sick patients and the acuity has gone way up,” Dr. Jayarama said. “We are taking all the right precautions. We are wearing the appropriate PPE. We ask all patients and visitors to wear masks. We can care for you safely.”

Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Davis with provider and nurseSkagit Regional Health staff and providers have treated dozens of inpatients with COVID-19 and are well equipped to care for each patient safely. Patients who test positive are cared for by staff with expertise in respiratory illness in rooms within specific areas of the hospitals with all appropriate precautions in place.

“We are continually monitoring the medical science and our community infection status. We are in close contact with Public Health. Skagit Regional Health is staying ahead of the curve on our safety supplies and processes,” said Connie L. Davis, MD, MHA, Regional Vice President and Chief Medical Officer. “Other than the protection of your own home, we are one of the safest places to be in our community. We are here for you. Come see us with your health concerns. Keep yourself on track for the best health.”

Family Medicine provider David Escobar, DO, who sees patients at Skagit Regional Health – Stanwood and Skagit Regional Clinics - Smokey Point notes that it is especially important for patients to receive care during times of stress.

“One’s health care needs shift frequently, especially during times of stress. We are all feeling the global stress of the current pandemic, and it is important to stay in touch with your primary care provider, especially during these uncertain times,” Dr. Escobar said. “We are offering video visits on a regular basis now and it is rewarding to continue my care of my patients both here in the clinic; and when I am invited to ‘join them’ in their kitchens and living rooms. Please don’t forgo your health care; your health care needs don’t stop because the world is shifting around us – and as always we are here to help.”

Routine care and vaccinations is especially important for children, said Pediatrician Rosana Go, MD of Arlington Pediatrics.

“Keeping your children’s vaccinations up to date is very important now more than ever especially during this time of uncertainty. Vaccines will help children fight off viral and bacterial infections and continue to keep them healthy!” Dr. Go said. “The health and wellbeing of your children will always be our top priority. We are always here to help and answer any questions you have.”

Dr. Barger during surgery

General Surgeon Jimmy Barger, DO, FACOS, who joined Skagit Regional Health in April 2020 as the virus was increasing in prevalence, has been impressed from the beginning with the organization’s safety standards and adherence to local, state and national guidelines.

“Skagit has taken excellent precautions every step of the way,” Dr. Barger said, noting ample PPE is available and staff, patients and visitors wear masks.

With the presence of the virus in the community, Dr. Barger emphasized that people should take the right precautions and seek care as needed.

“The risk of contracting the virus is not any higher in our clinics and hospitals than it is going to the grocery store,” he said. “It is safe. We have screening and masking measures in place and it’s very important to see your physician for concerns and maintenance of routine and chronic issues.”