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New MMR Exemption Law Now in Effect

Aug 2, 2019, 11:00 AM
New MMR Law Takes Effect
School girl walking up steps

In July 2019, a new measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine exemption law took effect in the state of Washington which could change your back-to-school routine. Children who attend school or child care can no longer use a personal/philosophical exemption for the MMR vaccine requirement. The new law does not change personal and philosophical exemptions for other vaccines.

Recent outbreaks across the United States, including in the Pacific Northwest, led to Washington legislators changing the exemption rules to better protect the public from the extremely contagious measles virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that all children receive the two-dose MMR vaccine. The first dose should be administered when your child is between 12 and 15 months old and the second dose between ages 4 and 6 years. If your child has not yet received the vaccine, talk to a healthcare provider about a catch-up schedule.

To schedule a well-child visit, back-to-school check-up or vaccine catch-up appointment, contact one of Skagit Regional Health’s pediatric or family medicine offices near you. 

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Last post : 08/23/2019

New MMR Exemption Law Now in Effect

Aug 2, 2019, 11:00 AM
New MMR Law Takes Effect
School girl walking up steps

In July 2019, a new measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine exemption law took effect in the state of Washington which could change your back-to-school routine. Children who attend school or child care can no longer use a personal/philosophical exemption for the MMR vaccine requirement. The new law does not change personal and philosophical exemptions for other vaccines.

Recent outbreaks across the United States, including in the Pacific Northwest, led to Washington legislators changing the exemption rules to better protect the public from the extremely contagious measles virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that all children receive the two-dose MMR vaccine. The first dose should be administered when your child is between 12 and 15 months old and the second dose between ages 4 and 6 years. If your child has not yet received the vaccine, talk to a healthcare provider about a catch-up schedule.

To schedule a well-child visit, back-to-school check-up or vaccine catch-up appointment, contact one of Skagit Regional Health’s pediatric or family medicine offices near you.