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da Vinci arrives

Oct 14, 2018, 13:03 PM
Skagit Regional Health launches surgical robotics

12_daVinci-1Skagit Regional Health opened a new chapter in the advancement of surgical services September 2018, with the addition of a da Vinci surgical robotic system.

The da Vinci® Xi™ Surgical System is used across a broad spectrum of surgical specialties including general surgery, urology, gynecology and other specialties. Skagit Regional Health will become the first healthcare system north of Everett to offer this advanced, Xi robotic-assisted technology.

“We are truly thrilled to be a leader in this field and look forward to continuing to bring technology and services, including these minimally invasive surgical options, to the patients we serve,” said Brian Ivie, President and Chief Executive Officer of Skagit Regional Health. “The robotic-assisted system is shown to improve patient outcomes, reduce recovery time and shorten hospital stays.”

Three general surgeons, Joel Dean, MD, Allison Porter, MD and Josh Hawkins, MD, are taking the lead using robotic surgery, with plans for providers in specialties, including urology and gynecology, to be among those to use the technology in the near future as the program grows.

Dr. Dean returned to Skagit Regional Health following a one-year Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City. Since 2014, he practiced general surgery at Skagit Regional Health. He said he saw a gap in the specialties available locally and decided to pursue a fellowship in colorectal care with a focus on robotic surgery.

 “This community needs a colorectal surgeon. The hardest cases that I encountered when I was practicing here at Skagit as a general surgeon were usually those within the purview of a colorectal surgeon. Fellowship training allowed me to hone what skills and knowledge I already had in this field and gain many more. It’s a specialty that will naturally fit into our environment at Skagit Regional Health,” Dr. Dean said. “I am really excited that Skagit decided to pursue a robotics program. We are bringing in the newest and the best equipment so we do it right.”

Fellow general surgeons Drs. Porter and Hawkins are also trained to use the robotic surgical system and said they are pleased to be part of rolling out the technology to benefit patients.

Dr. Porter, who brought specialty expertise to the Skagit Valley in 2015 after completing an Advanced Minimally Invasive Surgical Fellowship at the University of Washington has special interest in the foregut – which is the esophagus and stomach, the beginning of the digestive tract. Thus there is synergy in the department with Dr. Dean’s new expertise in colorectal care, which focuses on the hindgut, the end of the digestive tract.

“We already have the skill set and interest from providers that will parlay into a strong program. This will be a huge benefit to patients and will fit well into our practice. I’m glad to be a part of it,” Dr. Porter said.

Dr. Hawkins noted that the addition of a robotics program demonstrates the evolution and elevation of services available at Skagit Regional Health.

“The surgical services here are evolving and we are becoming more than a community hospital, we are becoming a local referral center that offers specialized surgical services,” Dr. Hawkins said. “This represents an outstanding opportunity for continuing our evolution and recruitment of additional specialties to meet our community’s needs. This is a higher level of care that we are excited to bring.”

General Surgery is among the specialties to see the most growth in use of robotics for minimally invasive procedures. Hernia repair, gallbladder removal, cancer surgery and colon resections are among the procedures that benefit from the system’s three-dimensional cameras.

“The image is so crisp. The robot gives me complete control of the camera, rather than having to rely on an assistant, and the instruments are precisely articulated to allow very fine, detailed surgery.” Dr. Dean said. “It’s exciting to see all these benefits and see the patients do so well.”

Dr. Porter described the improved image as the difference between watching a 2-D and a 3-D movie. “It is much easier to determine the distance of movement when watching on a three-dimensional, rather than two-dimensional, screen. This will be a definite improvement beyond standard laparoscopy,” she said. “Plus, there are things the robot can do that human hands cannot.”

Dr. Hawkins said the view brings a safety component as well.

“The 3-D camera is amazing,” he said. “I have visualization of structures that were impossible to see with our previous technology. This allows for safer surgery.”

The camera allows views of tight spaces in the body to allow for precision, safety, and the ability to protect nerves and preserve bowel and bladder control following some colorectal procedures.

“Robot-assisted surgery unquestionably gives superior visualization, especially when working deep down in the pelvis,” Dr. Dean said. “The articulating instruments also allow me, when working in tight spaces such as the pelvis, to accomplish things that I would otherwise not be able to do in a minimally invasive approach.”

Drs. Porter and Hawkins have recently completed additional training in robotic surgery and say they find they are enjoying the opportunity to learn new techniques.

“The robot is intuitive and it makes sense to me as a surgeon,” Dr. Hawkins said. “It’s like using a new tool to do things we already do.”

“I want to avoid stagnation over the course of my career, and have an open mind to a better way to perform surgery,” Dr. Porter said. “Medicine is constantly improving through change, and as surgeons, we should too. It is very exciting to have technology with better visualization and ergonomics.”

Surgeons sit at a console that adjusts to the individual provider’s settings during robotic surgery to control the intricate instruments and camera, which is easier on the surgeon’s body as well.

All three surgeons agree that they are pleased to bring a new, higher level of technology and surgical procedures to the people of the region.

“I am really excited that Skagit decided to pursue a robotics program. We are bringing in the newest and the best equipment so we do it right,” Dr. Dean said. “I don’t think patients should have to go to Seattle. This allows us to close that gap. There’s very little they can do in Seattle that we can’t do in Skagit.”

Sidebar

The da Vinci system features three main pieces:

• The Surgeon Console where a physician is seated in the operating room and views high-definition, 3-D  images on a monitor while using foot pedals and finger instruments to remotely control the camera and surgical instruments.

• The Patient-side Cart with overhead arms, mounted on a boom, is designed to hold three-dimensional cameras and surgical instruments at the surgical site.

• The computer “tower” to support the robotic system.

 

 

 

 

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Last post : 05/27/2022

da Vinci arrives

Oct 14, 2018, 13:03 PM
Skagit Regional Health launches surgical robotics

12_daVinci-1Skagit Regional Health opened a new chapter in the advancement of surgical services September 2018, with the addition of a da Vinci surgical robotic system.

The da Vinci® Xi™ Surgical System is used across a broad spectrum of surgical specialties including general surgery, urology, gynecology and other specialties. Skagit Regional Health will become the first healthcare system north of Everett to offer this advanced, Xi robotic-assisted technology.

“We are truly thrilled to be a leader in this field and look forward to continuing to bring technology and services, including these minimally invasive surgical options, to the patients we serve,” said Brian Ivie, President and Chief Executive Officer of Skagit Regional Health. “The robotic-assisted system is shown to improve patient outcomes, reduce recovery time and shorten hospital stays.”

Three general surgeons, Joel Dean, MD, Allison Porter, MD and Josh Hawkins, MD, are taking the lead using robotic surgery, with plans for providers in specialties, including urology and gynecology, to be among those to use the technology in the near future as the program grows.

Dr. Dean returned to Skagit Regional Health following a one-year Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City. Since 2014, he practiced general surgery at Skagit Regional Health. He said he saw a gap in the specialties available locally and decided to pursue a fellowship in colorectal care with a focus on robotic surgery.

 “This community needs a colorectal surgeon. The hardest cases that I encountered when I was practicing here at Skagit as a general surgeon were usually those within the purview of a colorectal surgeon. Fellowship training allowed me to hone what skills and knowledge I already had in this field and gain many more. It’s a specialty that will naturally fit into our environment at Skagit Regional Health,” Dr. Dean said. “I am really excited that Skagit decided to pursue a robotics program. We are bringing in the newest and the best equipment so we do it right.”

Fellow general surgeons Drs. Porter and Hawkins are also trained to use the robotic surgical system and said they are pleased to be part of rolling out the technology to benefit patients.

Dr. Porter, who brought specialty expertise to the Skagit Valley in 2015 after completing an Advanced Minimally Invasive Surgical Fellowship at the University of Washington has special interest in the foregut – which is the esophagus and stomach, the beginning of the digestive tract. Thus there is synergy in the department with Dr. Dean’s new expertise in colorectal care, which focuses on the hindgut, the end of the digestive tract.

“We already have the skill set and interest from providers that will parlay into a strong program. This will be a huge benefit to patients and will fit well into our practice. I’m glad to be a part of it,” Dr. Porter said.

Dr. Hawkins noted that the addition of a robotics program demonstrates the evolution and elevation of services available at Skagit Regional Health.

“The surgical services here are evolving and we are becoming more than a community hospital, we are becoming a local referral center that offers specialized surgical services,” Dr. Hawkins said. “This represents an outstanding opportunity for continuing our evolution and recruitment of additional specialties to meet our community’s needs. This is a higher level of care that we are excited to bring.”

General Surgery is among the specialties to see the most growth in use of robotics for minimally invasive procedures. Hernia repair, gallbladder removal, cancer surgery and colon resections are among the procedures that benefit from the system’s three-dimensional cameras.

“The image is so crisp. The robot gives me complete control of the camera, rather than having to rely on an assistant, and the instruments are precisely articulated to allow very fine, detailed surgery.” Dr. Dean said. “It’s exciting to see all these benefits and see the patients do so well.”

Dr. Porter described the improved image as the difference between watching a 2-D and a 3-D movie. “It is much easier to determine the distance of movement when watching on a three-dimensional, rather than two-dimensional, screen. This will be a definite improvement beyond standard laparoscopy,” she said. “Plus, there are things the robot can do that human hands cannot.”

Dr. Hawkins said the view brings a safety component as well.

“The 3-D camera is amazing,” he said. “I have visualization of structures that were impossible to see with our previous technology. This allows for safer surgery.”

The camera allows views of tight spaces in the body to allow for precision, safety, and the ability to protect nerves and preserve bowel and bladder control following some colorectal procedures.

“Robot-assisted surgery unquestionably gives superior visualization, especially when working deep down in the pelvis,” Dr. Dean said. “The articulating instruments also allow me, when working in tight spaces such as the pelvis, to accomplish things that I would otherwise not be able to do in a minimally invasive approach.”

Drs. Porter and Hawkins have recently completed additional training in robotic surgery and say they find they are enjoying the opportunity to learn new techniques.

“The robot is intuitive and it makes sense to me as a surgeon,” Dr. Hawkins said. “It’s like using a new tool to do things we already do.”

“I want to avoid stagnation over the course of my career, and have an open mind to a better way to perform surgery,” Dr. Porter said. “Medicine is constantly improving through change, and as surgeons, we should too. It is very exciting to have technology with better visualization and ergonomics.”

Surgeons sit at a console that adjusts to the individual provider’s settings during robotic surgery to control the intricate instruments and camera, which is easier on the surgeon’s body as well.

All three surgeons agree that they are pleased to bring a new, higher level of technology and surgical procedures to the people of the region.

“I am really excited that Skagit decided to pursue a robotics program. We are bringing in the newest and the best equipment so we do it right,” Dr. Dean said. “I don’t think patients should have to go to Seattle. This allows us to close that gap. There’s very little they can do in Seattle that we can’t do in Skagit.”

Sidebar

The da Vinci system features three main pieces:

• The Surgeon Console where a physician is seated in the operating room and views high-definition, 3-D  images on a monitor while using foot pedals and finger instruments to remotely control the camera and surgical instruments.

• The Patient-side Cart with overhead arms, mounted on a boom, is designed to hold three-dimensional cameras and surgical instruments at the surgical site.

• The computer “tower” to support the robotic system.