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The latest in pacemakers: Electrophysiologist offers new service

Jun 17, 2018, 00:00 AM
17_HealthQuestSummer2018-2

Technology in pacemakers is advancing rapidly. Today, tiny, battery-powered pacemakers are available for some patients that are rate responsive to the needs of the heart and carry a 10 to 12-year battery life.

These newer models of pacemakers are appropriate for patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) or a low heart rate and are inserted using a catheter rather than requiring an incision to implant.

Skagit Regional Health Electrophysiologist Ramy Hanna, MD, received specialized training in Minneapolis to learn the technique for inserting the Medtronic Micra™ pacemakers and offers the option to appropriate patients visiting the Cardiology clinic. Dr. Hanna said he is impressed by the technology.

“I think it’s pretty cool,” Dr. Hanna said. “It’s rate responsive, it senses a patient’s movement and will pick up the heart rate as needed and then revert to base rate and will last 10 to 12 years.”

Patients have been very pleased as well, Dr. Hanna said.

“Patients are impressed by the fact that they have a pacemaker, they have strong heartbeats and they have no incision and no leads or wires,” Dr. Hanna said.

The single-chamber pacemaker is inserted via a catheter in a vein in the upper thigh and the procedure is performed in the cardiac catheterization lab at Skagit Valley Hospital. Patients stay overnight in the hospital for monitoring and typically have fewer medical complications, he said.

Leadless pacemakers will be the trend for the future, Dr. Hanna said, noting work is underway to create technology to pace both chambers of the heart.

Ramy Hanna, MD is an electrophysiologist with Skagit Regional Clinics – Mount Vernon Cardiology. His office can be reached by calling 360-336-9757.

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Last post : 11/12/2019

The latest in pacemakers: Electrophysiologist offers new service

Jun 17, 2018, 00:00 AM
17_HealthQuestSummer2018-2

Technology in pacemakers is advancing rapidly. Today, tiny, battery-powered pacemakers are available for some patients that are rate responsive to the needs of the heart and carry a 10 to 12-year battery life.

These newer models of pacemakers are appropriate for patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) or a low heart rate and are inserted using a catheter rather than requiring an incision to implant.

Skagit Regional Health Electrophysiologist Ramy Hanna, MD, received specialized training in Minneapolis to learn the technique for inserting the Medtronic Micra™ pacemakers and offers the option to appropriate patients visiting the Cardiology clinic. Dr. Hanna said he is impressed by the technology.

“I think it’s pretty cool,” Dr. Hanna said. “It’s rate responsive, it senses a patient’s movement and will pick up the heart rate as needed and then revert to base rate and will last 10 to 12 years.”

Patients have been very pleased as well, Dr. Hanna said.

“Patients are impressed by the fact that they have a pacemaker, they have strong heartbeats and they have no incision and no leads or wires,” Dr. Hanna said.

The single-chamber pacemaker is inserted via a catheter in a vein in the upper thigh and the procedure is performed in the cardiac catheterization lab at Skagit Valley Hospital. Patients stay overnight in the hospital for monitoring and typically have fewer medical complications, he said.

Leadless pacemakers will be the trend for the future, Dr. Hanna said, noting work is underway to create technology to pace both chambers of the heart.

Ramy Hanna, MD is an electrophysiologist with Skagit Regional Clinics – Mount Vernon Cardiology. His office can be reached by calling 360-336-9757.