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Five injury prevention tips for athletes

May 12, 2018, 14:14 PM
Two people bike riding in the forest

Athletes need to take steps to remain healthy and not get side-lined by injury. Here are five tips from local health care professionals to help athletes reduce risk of injury:

Warm up. Walking, jogging and stretching before beginning an activity is a good way to loosen up your body to prepare for play.

Focus on proper technique. Using proper technique will help avoid injuries, said Dr. Christopher Sheu, orthopedic surgeon. Coaches can help ensure that athletes are using good technique to avoid injury and can emphasize quality movements over quantity, recommended physical therapist David Bond, PT, DPT.

Use appropriate safety equipment. “Use sport-specific helmets, mouth guards, personal flotation devices (PFDs) for water sports, and pads, braces, gloves, and footwear as appropriate to reduce your risk of injury,” said Bond. Coaches and trainers can help parents determine what safety equipment is needed for specific sports.

Cross train. If you are a basketball or football player, incorporate other activities into your workout routine, such as running, swimming or biking to train all sets of muscles, suggested Dr. Roger Lee, a Family Medicine provider with special interest in sports medicine.

Young athletes, in particular, should not overspecialize in a single activity. Kids who play one sport all year round have increased chance of developing overuse injuries.

Playing multiple sports during the year doesn’t mean that your child will fall behind in his or her favorite sport. In fact, Dr. Lee noted that research has shown that kids do not develop elite skill sets until high school. When kids are young, involvement in a variety of sports can help reduce both overuse injuries and burn out.

Don’t play through pain – get help! Listen to your body. If you are in pain, something is wrong. Rest and see if the pain goes away. If pain persists, see your health care provider, said Dr. Lee. Playing through pain can make the injury worse.

“Impairments in balance, awareness of body position, power, and performance can last longer than symptoms like pain and swelling,” said Bond. If you have had an injury, it is important to seek evaluation and treatment. “A physical therapist can help you safely return to sport and activity at a higher level of performance and with less risk for re-injury or a new injury due to non-optimal movement,” Bond said.

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Last post : 12/14/2019

Five injury prevention tips for athletes

May 12, 2018, 14:14 PM
Two people bike riding in the forest

Athletes need to take steps to remain healthy and not get side-lined by injury. Here are five tips from local health care professionals to help athletes reduce risk of injury:

Warm up. Walking, jogging and stretching before beginning an activity is a good way to loosen up your body to prepare for play.

Focus on proper technique. Using proper technique will help avoid injuries, said Dr. Christopher Sheu, orthopedic surgeon. Coaches can help ensure that athletes are using good technique to avoid injury and can emphasize quality movements over quantity, recommended physical therapist David Bond, PT, DPT.

Use appropriate safety equipment. “Use sport-specific helmets, mouth guards, personal flotation devices (PFDs) for water sports, and pads, braces, gloves, and footwear as appropriate to reduce your risk of injury,” said Bond. Coaches and trainers can help parents determine what safety equipment is needed for specific sports.

Cross train. If you are a basketball or football player, incorporate other activities into your workout routine, such as running, swimming or biking to train all sets of muscles, suggested Dr. Roger Lee, a Family Medicine provider with special interest in sports medicine.

Young athletes, in particular, should not overspecialize in a single activity. Kids who play one sport all year round have increased chance of developing overuse injuries.

Playing multiple sports during the year doesn’t mean that your child will fall behind in his or her favorite sport. In fact, Dr. Lee noted that research has shown that kids do not develop elite skill sets until high school. When kids are young, involvement in a variety of sports can help reduce both overuse injuries and burn out.

Don’t play through pain – get help! Listen to your body. If you are in pain, something is wrong. Rest and see if the pain goes away. If pain persists, see your health care provider, said Dr. Lee. Playing through pain can make the injury worse.

“Impairments in balance, awareness of body position, power, and performance can last longer than symptoms like pain and swelling,” said Bond. If you have had an injury, it is important to seek evaluation and treatment. “A physical therapist can help you safely return to sport and activity at a higher level of performance and with less risk for re-injury or a new injury due to non-optimal movement,” Bond said.