HealthQuest Stories

Show Results For:
Clear Filters

Patient Stories

View All

Subscribe to Our
e-Newsletter

Subscribe

Hospice of the Northwest Outreach Admission Specialist, Pam Putney

Mar 4, 2018, 09:34 AM
Older couple embraces

A recent study by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization shows more than 44 percent of Americans with less than six months to live choose hospice care. If someone learns they have a serious illness, such as cancer or congestive heart failure, they often want to do everything possible to find a cure. That’s understandable. Sometimes, however, the treatment can be physically and emotionally difficult, and ultimately causes the patient more pain and discomfort than they want to endure.

At this point, it might be time to consider a transition to hospice care. Rather than providing a cure, hospice care is designed to focus on comfort and quality of life. An interdisciplinary team works together to help keep a patient emotionally, physically and spiritually comfortable towards the end of life.

“If we are able to get to them and help them early enough, patients really do benefit from our services; this, in turn, can contribute to them living longer and better quality lives,” said Hospice of the Northwest Outreach Admission Specialist Pam Putney.

Getting hospice care does not necessarily mean dying sooner. In fact, sometimes the opposite is true. This might be attributed to patients being more comfortable without treatment side effects and because of the removal of non-essential medications from their daily regime.

The New England Journal of Medicine published a 2010 study on terminally ill lung cancer patients that showed those receiving palliative care had a better quality of life and lived an average of three months longer than those who did not seek this care. Palliative care focuses on relieving a patient’s suffering in all disease stages, and it often goes hand in hand with hospice care.

“We have residents who decide to go on hospice and when the team from Hospice of the Northwest comes in, suddenly the resident perks up and starts to feel better,” said a home care aide at a local assisted living facility. “They often get to stop taking all these pills; that alone helps with their quality of life.”

There are a number of tools available to walk through advanced care planning.

Decisions about end-of-life care are deeply personal, and conversations that focus on your wishes and beliefs will relieve loved ones and healthcare providers of the need to guess what you would want. For more information, contact Hospice of the Northwest at 360-814-5550 to make an appointment and talk to someone about advance directives.

Blog

113 posts

Last post : 12/14/2019

Hospice of the Northwest Outreach Admission Specialist, Pam Putney

Mar 4, 2018, 09:34 AM
Older couple embraces

A recent study by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization shows more than 44 percent of Americans with less than six months to live choose hospice care. If someone learns they have a serious illness, such as cancer or congestive heart failure, they often want to do everything possible to find a cure. That’s understandable. Sometimes, however, the treatment can be physically and emotionally difficult, and ultimately causes the patient more pain and discomfort than they want to endure.

At this point, it might be time to consider a transition to hospice care. Rather than providing a cure, hospice care is designed to focus on comfort and quality of life. An interdisciplinary team works together to help keep a patient emotionally, physically and spiritually comfortable towards the end of life.

“If we are able to get to them and help them early enough, patients really do benefit from our services; this, in turn, can contribute to them living longer and better quality lives,” said Hospice of the Northwest Outreach Admission Specialist Pam Putney.

Getting hospice care does not necessarily mean dying sooner. In fact, sometimes the opposite is true. This might be attributed to patients being more comfortable without treatment side effects and because of the removal of non-essential medications from their daily regime.

The New England Journal of Medicine published a 2010 study on terminally ill lung cancer patients that showed those receiving palliative care had a better quality of life and lived an average of three months longer than those who did not seek this care. Palliative care focuses on relieving a patient’s suffering in all disease stages, and it often goes hand in hand with hospice care.

“We have residents who decide to go on hospice and when the team from Hospice of the Northwest comes in, suddenly the resident perks up and starts to feel better,” said a home care aide at a local assisted living facility. “They often get to stop taking all these pills; that alone helps with their quality of life.”

There are a number of tools available to walk through advanced care planning.

Decisions about end-of-life care are deeply personal, and conversations that focus on your wishes and beliefs will relieve loved ones and healthcare providers of the need to guess what you would want. For more information, contact Hospice of the Northwest at 360-814-5550 to make an appointment and talk to someone about advance directives.